Tag Archives: stereotypes

Tunes Tuesday: Same Love

I just discovered this song this weekend and it simply left me speechless with its powerful message and beautiful music. I think it is my new favorite song. I hope you like it too.

Same Love
Macklemore and Ryan Lewis, Featuring Mary Lambert

When I was in the third grade
I thought that I was gay
‘Cause I could draw, my uncle was, and I kept my room straight

I told my mom tears rushing down my face
She’s like “Ben you’ve loved girls since before pre-k tripping,”
Yeah, I guess she had a point, didn’t she?
Bunch of stereotypes all in my head.

I remember doing the math like, “Yeah, I’m good at little league”
A preconceived idea of what it all meant
For those that liked the same sex
Had the characteristics

The right wing conservatives think it’s a decision
And you can be cured with some treatment and religion
Man made rewiring of a predisposition

Playing god, aw nah here we go
America the brave still fears what we don’t know
And god loves all his children, is somehow forgotten
But we paraphrase a book written thirty-five-hundred years ago
I don’t know

And I can’t change
Even if I tried
Even if I wanted to
I can’t change
Even if I try
Even if I wanted to
My love
My love
My love
She keeps me warm
She keeps me warm
She keeps me warm
She keeps me warm

If I was gay, I would think hip-hop hates me
Have you read the YouTube comments lately
“Man, that’s gay” gets dropped on the daily

We become so numb to what we’re saying
A culture founded from oppression
Yet we don’t have acceptance for ‘em

Call each other faggots behind the keys of a message board
A word rooted in hate, yet our genre still ignores it
Gay is synonymous with the lesser

It’s the same hate that’s caused wars from religion
Gender to skin color, the complexion of your pigment
The same fight that led people to walk outs and sit ins

It’s human rights for everybody, there is no difference!
Live on and be yourself

When I was at church they taught me something else
If you preach hate at the service those words aren’t anointed
That holy water that you soak in has been poisoned

When everyone else is more comfortable remaining voiceless
Rather than fighting for humans that have had their rights stolen
I might not be the same, but that’s not important
No freedom till we’re equal, damn right I support it

And I can’t change
Even if I tried
Even if I wanted to
My love
My love
My love
She keeps me warm
She keeps me warm
She keeps me warm
She keeps me warm

We press play, don’t press pause
Progress, march on
With the veil over our eyes
We turn our back on the cause
Till the day that my uncles can be united by law

When kids are walking ‘round the hallway plagued by pain in their heart
A world so hateful some would rather die than be who they are
And a certificate on paper isn’t gonna solve it all
But it’s a damn good place to start
No law is gonna change us
We have to change us
Whatever god you believe in
We come from the same one
Strip away the fear
Underneath it’s all the same love
About time that we raised up

And I can’t change
Even if I tried
Even if I wanted to
I can’t change
Even if I try
Even if I wanted to
My love
My love
My love
She keeps me warm
She keeps me warm
She keeps me warm
She keeps me warm
Love is patient
Love is kind
Love is patient
Love is kind
(I‘m not crying on Sundays)
Love is patient
(I‘m not crying on Sundays)
Love is kind
(I‘m not crying on Sundays)
Love is patient
(I‘m not crying on Sundays)
Love is kind
(I‘m not crying on Sundays)
Love is patient
(I‘m not crying on Sundays)
Love is kind
(I‘m not crying on Sundays)
Love is patient
Love is kind

What do you think? Has a song’s lyrics ever made you speechless the first time you listened to them? What song?

I would love to hear your thoughts. Thank you for reading.

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Filed under equality, Love, Music, Stereotypes

Tunes Tuesday: But don’t you believe them!

Image courtesy of freedigitalphotos.net

For today’s Tunes Tuesday, I am highlighting the words of a poignant Bruce Hornsby song.

I promised to focus my Tunes Tuesday posts on political lyrics from now until the election, so this song continues in that vein. This song has always touched me. The most important line in this song is “But don’t you believe them!”

The election is two weeks away. Have you voted?

That’s Just the Way It Is
Bruce Hornsby

Standing in line marking time, waiting for the welfare dime
‘Cause they can’t buy a job
The man in the silk suit hurries by
As he catches the poor old ladies’ eyes just for fun he says, “Get a job”

That’s just the way it is
Some things will never change
That’s just the way it is
But don’t you believe them

They say hey little boy you can’t go where the others go
‘Cause you don’t look like they do
Said hey old man how can you stand to think that way
Did you really think about it before you made the rules, he said, son

That’s just the way it is
Some things will never change
That’s just the way it is
But don’t you believe them

Well they passed a law in ’64
To give those who ain’t got a little more
But it only goes so far because the law don’t change another’s mind
When all it sees at the hiring time is the line on the color bar

That’s just the way it is
Some things will never change
That’s just the way it is
Thats just the way it is, it is, it is, it is

What do you think? What is your favorite political song? (Note: I may feature it for next week’s Tunes Tuesday post!) What is your favorite line from a song which represents your feelings on politics or social issues?

I would love to hear your thoughts. Thank you for reading!

20 Comments

Filed under Economy, equality, Ethics, Income inequality, Music, Policy, Politcs, Poverty, Role of Government, Stereotypes

Why Are There So Few Women in Math and Science Professions?

There is a fascinating story on NPR this week about the lack of women in math and science fields that is worth a read.

It explores the reasons that there are more men than women in these fields and the reasons that many women do not stay in these fields. The article lays the blame on women’s awareness of stereotypes regarding their competency in these areas.

The author makes it clear that the problem is not all in women’s heads, but rather lays the blame at the feet of the pervasive messages that women hear on a daily basis about their abilities, or inabilities, in these areas.

I find this fascinating. When I was in middel school, I was told I was bad at two things – OK, maybe 3 things – math, science and art. Whether the people who told me these things recognized that they sent me this messages as a teenager or not, these messages stuck with me over the years; in fact, these messages have stuck with me to this day.

I worked in the field of domestic violence for many years and was always interested in the programs that many shelters have for children who have witnessed domestic violence, where they use art therapy to help children heal and cope with their untenable family situation.

As someone who was told that art was not a personal strength, I always felt more stressed by the idea of this type of therapy than soothed. The messages we are told when we are young stick with us.

The story on NPR seems to confirm this and posits the theory that this is one of the main reasons that women, even women in high level math and science professions, do not stay in those positions.

The story points out a fundamental challenge, in which there are not many women in these fields, and women seem less likely to enter these fields because they do not see themselves represented in these professions.

Quite a chicken and the egg conundrum.

What do you think? Have you, or your children, had any personal experiences with being told that you were not good at something? Have you found ways to counter these messages that work for you? Do you have any ideas about how more women could be encouraged to enter the fields of math and science? Or do you think that it is not really a problem to have this field so dominated by men?

I would love to hear your thoughts. Thank you for reading.

 

 

51 Comments

Filed under Business, Career Planning, Culture, Economy, Education, equality, Ethics, Health, Parenting, Policy, Politcs, Relationships, Role of Government, social pressures, Stereotypes, Technology, Women, Youth Leadership

Rethinking His Religion

So, for the first news story – and the one that inspired me to start this blog, I have chosen “Rethinking His Religion,” which was published in the New York Times on March 24th. To read the article, go to: http://www.nytimes.com/2012/03/25/opinion/sunday/bruni-a-catholic-classmate-rethinks-his-religion.html?_r=1&scp=22&sq=jesus&st=cse

This is an article which really calls into question the assumptions we make about people. It is such a natural human tendancy to make snap judgements, especially about people. But so frequently, these judgements can turn out to be completely wrong. And we can easily miss out on connecting with a person who could have taught us something profound or touched our lives in some very personal way by not second-guessing these assumptions.

I know that all of us have experienced this at one time or another – meeting a person who helped us see the world in a whole new way or who made us question our assumptions. I always have to smile when that happens and think that I have just been given a reminder not to jump to conclusions.

One example I remember well, was in 1996. I was working at NOW Legal Defense and Education Fund. A woman who is now a wonderful friend of mine came into the office to apply for a graduate-level internship. She was (and still is) beautiful, with long flowing model-like blond hair and high heels. She was very well dressed and may have even had a manicure. Immediately, I thought “That canNOT be a feminist.” And I know she had some assumptions about me when we first met as well. It turns out that, not only is she an ardent feminist, but she is one of the smartest, funniest, most thoughtful people I know. I have been lucky to have her in my life and would have missed out on this friendship if I had not looked beyond my initial assumptions.

This article is also about one person’s personal evolution through his exposure to a broader world. For me, this is a story of a person who was willing to question his assumptions about himself and about the things he believed when he was young. It takes a strong person to be willing to do that.

What does this article bring up for you? When have you been forced to rethink your judgements and assumptions? And what kind of personal evolutions have you and your friends experienced that changed your perspective and fundamental beliefs?

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Filed under Stereotypes